Images of globalization

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) average annual growth, 1990–2003

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/gross-domestic-product-gdp-average-annua...

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) average annual growth, 1990–2003. Average annual percentage growth rate of GDP at market prices based on constant local currency. Dollar figures for GDP are converted from domestic currencies using 1995 official exchange rates. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products.

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) average annual growth, 1990–2003

Natural resources - agricultural potential

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/natural-resources-agricultural-potential

 

Natural resources - agricultural potential. Soils underpin the production of a wide range of agricultural and industrial goods and services. Soil productivity is essential to agricultural activities - for food security, cash income and supporting the livelihoods of the poor. Agriculture is the major engine of economic growth in a majority of developing countries – for instance low income developing countries have a high share of agriculture in gross domestic product. This map presents a potential agricultural output from cereals, provided proper support in equipment, seeds, practices and irrigation. The map is a part of a set, presenting different natural resources, with a focus on developing countries, and the use of natural resources for economic growth and poverty alleviation.

Natural resources - agricultural potential

Global Trade in Forest Products

Sources: FAO 2008a. Link to web-site: http://grida.no/publications/vg/forest/ Cartographer/Designer: Philippe Rekacewicz assisted by Cecile Marin, Agnes Stienne, Guilio Frigieri, Riccardo Pravettoni, Laura Margueritte and Marion Lecoquierre. Appears in: Vital Forest Graphics Published: 2009 (Available UNEP)Global Trade in Forest Products

Struggles for Water Resource

The Coming Water Wars, International Networks Archive (INA), Princeton University (http://www.princeton.edu/~ina/index.html)

This map shows that water can become a major source of struggle for resources.

Struggles for Water Resource

Global Brain?

This image, captured in May 1999, maps all backbone routers based on distance from Lumeta's mapping host in New Jersey. On the color scale, yellow represents the closest nodes, while dark red is farthest away. Readers can construct their own metaphors about this image's similarity to neural networks of a human brain.
Source: http://www.informationweek.com/galleries/showImage.jhtml?galleryID=246&i...

Global Brain?

Urban, dryland, and polar systems

Urban, dryland, and polar systems. Urban systems are built environments with a high human density. For mapping purposes, the MA uses known human settlements with a population of 5,000 or more, with boundaries delineated by observing persistent night-time lights or by inferring areal extent in the cases where such observations are absent.

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/urban-dryland-and-polar-systems

 

Urban, dryland, and polar systems

Transnational North American Rail

The rail network of North America continues to consolidate, but it is beginning to become transnational as well.Since NAFTA, Canadian National has acquired several US regional railways, and Kansas City Southern has purchased Transportacion Ferroviaria Mexicana — both part of a drive towards a "NAFTA Rail" alliance. Together the eight Class I railroads (defined as having more than $277.7m in revenues) shown on the map control approximately two thirds of all rail on the continent. There are more than four hundred Class II and III railways. From http://www.radicalcartography.net/index.html?rail

Transnational North American Rail
User Reference: 
eljacobs