Images of globalization

Trends in urban and rural populations, less developed regions, 1960-2030 (estimates and projections)

Sources: United Nations Population Division. 2007. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2007 Revision Population Database. HYPERLINK 'http://esa.un.org/unup/index.asp?panel=1' http://esa.un.org/unup/index.asp?panel=1 (Accessed November 28, 2008) Link to web-site http://www.grida.no/publications/rr/food-crisis/ Cartographer/Designer: Hugo Ahlenius, Nordpil Appears in: The Environmental Food Crisis - The Environment's Role in Averting Future Food Crises Published: 2009 (Available: UNEP)Trends in urban and rural populations, less developed regions, 1960-2030 (estimates and projections)

Urban population: status and trends

Urban population: status and trends. Since the dawn of civilization, people have been aggregating in towns and cities. This trend has reached an even higher rate with the dawn of industrialisation, and especially in developing countries, as seen in the graphic. From 1975 to 2015 the number of people in urban areas is projected to more than double.

 

http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/urban_population_status_and_trends

Urban population: status and trends

Genetic Tracing of Migration Patterns

Tracing Human History With Genetics, NYT (Dec 9, 2006)

(http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2006/12/09/us/20061210_DNA_GRAPHIC.htm...)

This New York Times map uses genetic mutation patterns to examine human evolution and migration.

Genetic Tracing of Migration Patterns

Transportation Means

Getting Around: Transportation Today, International Networks Archive (INA), Princeton University (http://www.princeton.edu/~ina/index.html)

This graphic visualizes the various forms of transportation available to today's population.

Transportation Means

The map of how bin Laden news spread through the Twittersphere

May 2, 2011, Dean Takahashi
http://venturebeat.com/2011/05/02/the-map-of-how-bin-laden-news-spread-t...

"The map above shows just how fast it all happened in the first 12 hours after the first tweets about the killing of the world’s most-wanted terrorist, starting around 730 pm Pacific time on Sunday. Sysomos said that its social media monitoring tool measured the spread.

Sheldon Levine of Sysomos said that about an hour and fifteen minutes after the word started spreading, and just as President Obama finished his address, there were more than 500,000 tweets, 796 blog posts and 507 published news articles. About 2.5 hours after the news broke, there were 860,177 tweets, 3,079 blog mentions, and 3,235 news stories."

The map of how bin Laden news spread through the Twittersphere